Our Stories

Meet Nicholas

“My name is Nicholas and I’m 13 years old. I love hockey, rock collecting and hanging out with friends.  I was diagnosed with Tourette Syndrome when I was 7 years old and back then I didn’t think that anyone would want to marry me. My tics include jumping, sniffing, eye blinking, coughing and making some vocal sounds. I learned that I may have Tourettes but Tourettes doesn’t have me. I will achieve my goals in life.

Please donate to help support me and other children with Tourette Syndrome.”

Currently, Nicholas’s tics are:

  • jumping,
  • sniffing,
  • eye blinking,
  • coughing and making some vocal sounds.

Q and A with Nicholas (to come)

Meet Richard

” My name is Richard and I’m 14 years old. I love science, math, building things with my hands, scuba diving, playing the drums, doing parkour and playing video games. I have Tourette Syndrome but it doesn’t slow me down. Tourette Syndrome made me who I am now. I am creative, adventurous and very detail-oriented. I love puzzles and I don’t stop until I can solve them. I really didn’t understand my Tourette when I was young but with more knowledge, and community awareness, and the support from my parents, family,  and friends, I have learned to accept myself and my Tourettes.

Please donate to help spread awareness of Tourette Syndrome.”

Currently, Richard’s tics are:

  • Cracks his neck, and knuckles,
  • eye blinking,
  • making wide eyes and twitching,
  • stuttering, and
  • vocal tics (throat clearing).

Q and A with Richard

by Tourette Canada – Ottawa Chapter (TCOC)

TCOC: What do you want to do when you grow up?

R: Mechanical engineering.

TCOC:  Does Tourette’s make it difficult for you to learn or play sports?

R: No, not at all.

TCOC: Do your friends make fun of your Tourette’s?

R: The occasional joke but no, not at all.  I just share my story with my friends and they understand.

TCOC: Do you know what your tics are? Do you know when you do them?

R: Yes I know what my tics are and I am also aware when I do them.

TCOC: Do your friends ask you about your Tourette’s?

R: No.

TCOC: If you could tell another child that had Tourette Syndrome that was maybe having difficulties with friends making fun of them, what would it be?

R: If you feel that people are bullying you or teasing you about your Tourette Syndrome; you just have to tell them that you can’t control them and that is who you are.

TCOC: Do you want people to treat you differently from others?

R: Nope, I’m just like everyone else!

TCOC: Do you tell people that you have Tourette Syndrome?

R: No I don’t, unless people question what I am doing.

Meet Amelia

“My name is Amelia and I’m 8 years old. I love science, singing, swimming and playing with my friends. I have Tourette Syndrome but Tourette doesn’t stop me from reaching my goals. Tourette Syndrome doesn’t define who I am and what I’m capable of.

Please donate to help support me and other children with Tourette Syndrome.”

Currently, Amelia’s tics are:

  • stretching of her neck,
  • raising her right arm,
  • eye blinking,
  • making wide eyes and looking to one side,
  • stuttering, and
  • vocal tics (little squeaks).

The most difficult tic thus far has been the stuttering.  This makes it difficult in class when doing presentations or reading out loud.

Q and A with Amelia

by Tourette Canada – Ottawa Chapter (TCOC)

TCOC: What do you want to do when you grow up?

A: So many things…maybe a scientist?  Right now I really want to be a famous YouTuber though.

TCOC:  Does Tourette’s make it difficult for you to learn or play sports?

A: No, not at all.

TCOC: Do your friends make fun of your Tourette’s?

A: No, not at all.  It helps that Jill came to my school to tell my friends and teachers about Tourette Syndrome.  I was able to show my friends what my tics were.

**From a parent perspective, after the annual visit, we notice a significant boost in her self esteem.  There are no words to describe how thankful we are that this resource is available!

TCOC: Do you know what your tics are?

A: No.  I don’t even know I’m doing them.

TCOC: Do your friends ask you about your Tourette’s?

A: Sometimes.  But I tell them that it is not contagious and it just makes me unique. 

TCOC: If you could tell another child that had Tourette Syndrome that was maybe having difficulties with friends making fun of them, what would it be?

A: Don’t let them stand in your way!  Tell them you have Tourette’s and that inside you are just like them!

TCOC: Do you want people to treat you differently from others?

A: No, please don’t.  I’m just like you!

TCOC: Do you tell people that you have Tourette Syndrome?

A: Yes, if I can’t sit still or can’t talk right away when someone asks me something I just tell them “it’s just my Tourette’s”.

**This year, Amelia told both of her teachers on the first day that she had Tourette’s – without any prompting.